Discussion:
Rolling Stone's 40 essential albums of 1967
(too old to reply)
poisoned rose
2008-06-30 19:12:05 UTC
Permalink
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933

Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.

Nothing too controversial about this list (especially since it's unranked), but I do gotta wonder
about including the Serpent Power (who??) at the expense of other pop/rock staples including three
Monkees records, Their Satanic Majesties Request, the Mothers' Absolutely Free and Captain
Beefheart's Safe as Milk. And if blues albums are fair game (see Mississippi John Hurt), where is
Magic Sam's legendary West Side Soul?

(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)

Anyone heard the Serpent Power? The AllMusic soundclips sound dated, but not too bad. Kinda like
Jefferson Airplane in their early folk-rock phase, plus tinny Ray Manzarek organ? Though I bet the
13-minute track is a chore to sit through.

http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hjfuxqugldfe

The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)

Further notes on the text:

1. I like the description of "Something Happened to Me Yesterday" as "the Stones' drollest
odd-track-out ever."

2. I might not have heard before that Jerry Garcia was responsible for the title "Surrealistic
Pillow." Maybe I've just forgotten.

3. The Grateful Dead's debut has a user rating of one star! Heh.

4. I didn't know "the Fish" in Country Joe & the Fish was a Mao Tse-Tung allusion. Says Wikipedia:
"...'the fish' refers to Mao Tse-Tung's statement that the true revolutionary must 'swim among the
people as a fish.'"

5. I also didn't know Arlo Guthrie re-recorded the entire Alice's Restaurant album in 1997. That's a
little...pathetic.

6. Also didn't know Days of Future Passed came in the aftermath of the Moodies being asked to record
an adaptation of Dvorak's Ninth Symphony. Strange.

7. Twenty-three (complete?) takes for Tim Buckley's "I Never Asked to Be Your Mountain," including
band!

8. A bit irked by the "sappy" description of "Fool on the Hill," but the "Flying"/Beck comparison is
interesting.

9. A bit irked by the passive-aggressive jabs aimed at Love's Forever Changes. I'd agree that it's
slightly overrated by the "lost masterpiece!" sect, but "lionized beyond all reason" and "occult
folderol" seem a bit strong. "Somewhat fussy" and lyrically "obscure"...OK, maybe.

10. Wow...was Wild Honey really only 24 minutes? Having it on CD as a two-fer plus bonus tracks, I
never noticed this before.

11. By general standards, I'd say Band of Gypsies easily tops Axis: Bold as Love as Hendrix's "most
overlooked album." Didn't know Hendrix lost the original side-one mixes in a taxi, though. Nice one!
t***@aerovons.com
2008-06-30 20:42:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Nothing too controversial about this list (especially since it's unranked), but I do gotta wonder
about including the Serpent Power (who??) at the expense of other pop/rock staples including three
Monkees records, Their Satanic Majesties Request, the Mothers' Absolutely Free and Captain
Beefheart's Safe as Milk. And if blues albums are fair game (see Mississippi John Hurt), where is
Magic Sam's legendary West Side Soul?
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
Anyone heard the Serpent Power? The AllMusic soundclips sound dated, but not too bad. Kinda like
Jefferson Airplane in their early folk-rock phase, plus tinny Ray Manzarek organ? Though I bet the
13-minute track is a chore to sit through.
http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hjfuxqugldfe
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
1. I like the description of "Something Happened to Me Yesterday" as "the Stones' drollest
odd-track-out ever."
2. I might not have heard before that Jerry Garcia was responsible for the title "Surrealistic
Pillow." Maybe I've just forgotten.
3. The Grateful Dead's debut has a user rating of one star! Heh.
"...'the fish' refers to Mao Tse-Tung's statement that the true revolutionary must 'swim among the
people as a fish.'"
5. I also didn't know Arlo Guthrie re-recorded the entire Alice's Restaurant album in 1997. That's a
little...pathetic.
6. Also didn't know Days of Future Passed came in the aftermath of the Moodies being asked to record
an adaptation of Dvorak's Ninth Symphony. Strange.
7. Twenty-three (complete?) takes for Tim Buckley's "I Never Asked to Be Your Mountain," including
band!
8. A bit irked by the "sappy" description of "Fool on the Hill," but the "Flying"/Beck comparison is
interesting.
9. A bit irked by the passive-aggressive jabs aimed at Love's Forever Changes. I'd agree that it's
slightly overrated by the "lost masterpiece!" sect, but "lionized beyond all reason" and "occult
folderol" seem a bit strong. "Somewhat fussy" and lyrically "obscure"...OK, maybe.
10. Wow...was Wild Honey really only 24 minutes? Having it on CD as a two-fer plus bonus tracks, I
never noticed this before.
11. By general standards, I'd say Band of Gypsies easily tops Axis: Bold as Love as Hendrix's "most
overlooked album." Didn't know Hendrix lost the original side-one mixes in a taxi, though. Nice one!
You have to click through Moby Grape and Howard Tate before you get to
Sgt Pepper's. Enough said. ;)

TH
poisoned rose
2008-06-30 21:32:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by t***@aerovons.com
You have to click through Moby Grape and Howard Tate before you get to
Sgt Pepper's. Enough said. ;)
TH
I said at the start that it was clearly unranked. And I don't know how
you concluded it's "alphabetical"?
Post by t***@aerovons.com
It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP. That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
Those damn December releases.....

RS probably decided the album was more 1968 than 1967. Great album,
though.
t***@aerovons.com
2008-07-01 02:36:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by t***@aerovons.com
You have to click through Moby Grape and Howard Tate before you get to
Sgt Pepper's. Enough said. ;)
TH
I said at the start that it was clearly unranked. And I don't know how
you concluded it's "alphabetical"?
Post by t***@aerovons.com
It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP.  That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
Those damn December releases.....
RS probably decided the album was more 1968 than 1967. Great album,
though.
Saw the first two were "D"s and didn't think enough about it...sorry
'bout that...
TH
t***@aerovons.com
2008-06-30 20:43:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Nothing too controversial about this list (especially since it's unranked), but I do gotta wonder
about including the Serpent Power (who??) at the expense of other pop/rock staples including three
Monkees records, Their Satanic Majesties Request, the Mothers' Absolutely Free and Captain
Beefheart's Safe as Milk. And if blues albums are fair game (see Mississippi John Hurt), where is
Magic Sam's legendary West Side Soul?
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
Anyone heard the Serpent Power? The AllMusic soundclips sound dated, but not too bad. Kinda like
Jefferson Airplane in their early folk-rock phase, plus tinny Ray Manzarek organ? Though I bet the
13-minute track is a chore to sit through.
http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hjfuxqugldfe
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
1. I like the description of "Something Happened to Me Yesterday" as "the Stones' drollest
odd-track-out ever."
2. I might not have heard before that Jerry Garcia was responsible for the title "Surrealistic
Pillow." Maybe I've just forgotten.
3. The Grateful Dead's debut has a user rating of one star! Heh.
"...'the fish' refers to Mao Tse-Tung's statement that the true revolutionary must 'swim among the
people as a fish.'"
5. I also didn't know Arlo Guthrie re-recorded the entire Alice's Restaurant album in 1997. That's a
little...pathetic.
6. Also didn't know Days of Future Passed came in the aftermath of the Moodies being asked to record
an adaptation of Dvorak's Ninth Symphony. Strange.
7. Twenty-three (complete?) takes for Tim Buckley's "I Never Asked to Be Your Mountain," including
band!
8. A bit irked by the "sappy" description of "Fool on the Hill," but the "Flying"/Beck comparison is
interesting.
9. A bit irked by the passive-aggressive jabs aimed at Love's Forever Changes. I'd agree that it's
slightly overrated by the "lost masterpiece!" sect, but "lionized beyond all reason" and "occult
folderol" seem a bit strong. "Somewhat fussy" and lyrically "obscure"...OK, maybe.
10. Wow...was Wild Honey really only 24 minutes? Having it on CD as a two-fer plus bonus tracks, I
never noticed this before.
11. By general standards, I'd say Band of Gypsies easily tops Axis: Bold as Love as Hendrix's "most
overlooked album." Didn't know Hendrix lost the original side-one mixes in a taxi, though. Nice one!
OK OK, it's alphabetical. ;)

TH
Bernie Woodham
2008-06-30 21:12:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Yeah, a pretty anecdotal list. Good thing it wasn't rated or I doubt I
would've spent as much time as I did on it.

The Serpent Power took me by surprise also. Never heard of them before. That
sent me off to bittorrent where I found myself alone except for one other
person looking for the lp. No luck there at all, so thanks for the link.

It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP. That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
crazytimes
2008-06-30 21:36:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernie Woodham
Post by poisoned rose
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Yeah, a pretty anecdotal list. Good thing it wasn't rated or I doubt I
would've spent as much time as I did on it.
The Serpent Power took me by surprise also. Never heard of them before. That
sent me off to bittorrent where I found myself alone except for one other
person looking for the lp. No luck there at all, so thanks for the link.
It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP. That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
The Stones' Flowers really doesn't belong on there... Wild Honey or
Smiley Smile, one of them has to go... And I guess it's possible to
stick more random Blues albums on there, and even some more Soul and
Motown stuff... But with these lists it's always a matter of
'Essential' to whom?... There doesn't seem to be an author or
explanation for the list's compiling... Arlo's 'Alice's Restaurant'
song is about four years ahead of its time...
Just Walkin'
2008-07-01 14:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bernie Woodham
It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP. That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
Agreed. Traffic was influential, hence essential, even in retrospect.

As mentioned, the list contains too many redundancies (eg. Between the
Buttons/Flowers, Smiley Smile/Wild Honey, etc.) out of which one could
have been dropped to include any number of the following, if your
memory serves you well: Mothers of Invention's Absolutely Free,
Pearls Before Swine's One Nation Underground, Paul Butterfield Band's
The Resurrection of Pigboy Crabshaw, Canned Heat's debut, Vanilla
Fudge's debut, The Yardbirds' Little Games, Booker T. and the MGs' Hip
Hug-Her, Carryin' On with Johnny Cash and June Carter, Englebert
Humperdink's Release Me, Tom Jones' The Green, Green Grass of Home and
Elvis Presley's How Great Thou Art. We could also toss Paul Revere
and the Raiders and Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits in there, even
though they weren't great albums in and of themselves, they did
contain some of these influential bands' greatest works from the
preceding years.

What do you think pr, any of these listed above make your list of
essential '67 vinyl?
Babs
2008-07-01 14:36:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Just Walkin'
Post by Bernie Woodham
It's nice that they remembered Moby Grape. But, the ultimate boo-boo for me
was the absence of Traffic's Mr. Fantasy LP.  That was a big one, and one I
still listen to on occasion.
Agreed. Traffic was influential, hence essential, even in retrospect.
As mentioned, the list contains too many redundancies (eg. Between the
Buttons/Flowers, Smiley Smile/Wild Honey, etc.) out of which one could
have been dropped to include any number of the following, if your
memory serves you well:  Mothers of Invention's Absolutely Free,
Pearls Before Swine's One Nation Underground, Paul Butterfield Band's
The Resurrection of Pigboy Crabshaw, Canned Heat's debut, Vanilla
Fudge's debut, The Yardbirds' Little Games, Booker T. and the MGs' Hip
Hug-Her, Carryin' On with Johnny Cash and June Carter, Englebert
Humperdink's Release Me, Tom Jones' The Green, Green Grass of Home and
Elvis Presley's How Great Thou Art.  We could also toss Paul Revere
and the Raiders and Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits in there, even
though they weren't great albums in and of themselves, they did
contain some of these influential bands' greatest works from the
preceding years.
What do you think pr, any of these listed above make your list of
essential '67 vinyl?
Yikes! I haven't listened to that Vanilla Fudge in ages. I'm gonna put
it on now -- the album that seemed like it would never end. I wanted
it to go on and on and on...
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 20:13:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Just Walkin'
Mothers of Invention's Absolutely Free,
Pearls Before Swine's One Nation Underground, Paul Butterfield Band's
The Resurrection of Pigboy Crabshaw, Canned Heat's debut, Vanilla
Fudge's debut, The Yardbirds' Little Games, Booker T. and the MGs' Hip
Hug-Her, Carryin' On with Johnny Cash and June Carter, Englebert
Humperdink's Release Me, Tom Jones' The Green, Green Grass of Home and
Elvis Presley's How Great Thou Art. We could also toss Paul Revere
and the Raiders and Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits in there, even
though they weren't great albums in and of themselves, they did
contain some of these influential bands' greatest works from the
preceding years.
What do you think pr, any of these listed above make your list of
essential '67 vinyl?
Well, I already mentioned Absolutely Free myself. And it's "not my
thing," but one could certainly make a good case for the Butterfield
album being one of the year's essential releases. But I'm dubious about
whether the others have the muscle to push out the albums already
listed. Or even the other prime omissions which I had mentioned.

Tom Jones, Englebert and gospel Elvis? Oof.
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 22:20:41 UTC
Permalink
Looked up the top 40 of the critical consensus on the Acclaimed Music
website (http://www.acclaimedmusic.net/Current/1967a.htm)....

Only 25 of 40 albums in common. A pretty significant difference, though
it's partly due to Rolling Stone consciously trying to stay within the
pop/rock/soul realm. Maybe it's also due to the "essential" description,
which suggests sort of an "elementary guide to 1967 music" rather than
necessarily the very best releases.

In any case, Rolling Stone includes:

Donovan-Mellow Yellow
Otis Redding/Carla Thomas-King & Queen
The Grateful Dead-The Grateful Dead
Howard Tate-Get It While You Can
Rolling Stones-Flowers
Hollies-Evolution
James Brown-Cold Sweat
Big Brother & the Holding Company-Big Brother & the Holding Company
Arlo Guthrie-Alice's Restaurant
Beach Boys-Smiley Smile
Beach Boys-Wild Honey
Van Morrison-Blowin' Your Mind
Dionne Warwick-Golden Hits Part One
The Serpent Power-The Serpent Power
Mississippi John Hurt-The Immortal

And Acclaimed Music replaces the above with:

Captain Beefheart and His Magic Band-Safe as Milk
Traffic-Mr. Fantasy
Albert King-Born Under a Bad Sign
Otis Redding-Live in Europe
Magic Sam-West Side Soul
Mothers of Invention-Absolutely Free
Duke Ellington-The Far East Suite
Etta James-Tell Mama
Frank Sinatra and Antonio Carlos Jobim-Francis Albert Sinatra and
Antonio Carlos Jobim
Shivkumar Sharma, Brijbushan Kabra & Hariprasad Chaurasia-Call of the
Valley [uhhh...wut?]
Four Tops-Reach Out
McCoy Tyner-The Real McCoy
Sam and Dave-Soul Men
Love-Da Capo
The Red Crayola-The Parable of Arable Land

Still no love for the Monkees. Tsk. Though Acclaimed Music does give
Headquarters sort of a honorable-mention.
Robert
2008-06-30 22:36:19 UTC
Permalink
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
poisoned rose
2008-06-30 22:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.

1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.

Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Janice
2008-06-30 23:10:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
. . .
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
...
Well, I look at that list and can't help but think: no wonder we felt
high.

It pleases me no end to learn that vinyl is making a substantial
comeback, and while everyone is talking about the quality of analog
over digital (and it's true), I am rejoicing over the idea of the
renewal of album art. While I have emotional ties to almost every
album on that list, what I really want is every one of those album
covers for my walls.

~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Take it back, take it back, take that thing right out of here.
Eiron
2008-07-01 10:17:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janice
It pleases me no end to learn that vinyl is making a substantial
comeback, and while everyone is talking about the quality of analog
over digital (and it's true)
That quality includes distortion, hum, hiss, rumble, pops and crackles.
So what are the good points of vinyl?
I've been listening to a lot of it recently on headphones so I know
how bad it is, even with good equipment, not that you can buy a decent
cartridge any more.
--
Eiron.
Bernie Woodham
2008-07-01 15:47:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eiron
Post by Janice
It pleases me no end to learn that vinyl is making a substantial
comeback, and while everyone is talking about the quality of analog
over digital (and it's true)
That quality includes distortion, hum, hiss, rumble, pops and crackles.
So what are the good points of vinyl?
I've been listening to a lot of it recently on headphones so I know
how bad it is, even with good equipment, not that you can buy a decent
cartridge any more.
--
Eiron.
I like to think that I can see the day coming when the music companies will
be selling 2.8224 MHz audio with 5.1 surround sound exclusively. Memory is
cheap and you can now get 8 gigabytes on a card the size of a dime. They
already have 5.1 surround sound headphones. This would give the big music
companies another chance at unbreakable encryption that would once again put
them in their king of the hill position. Once the consumer was spoiled with
such high quality sound coming through their ipods they would never again be
satisfied with mp3.

That would still leave us without the album jacket artwork, which was a big
part of the fun of vinyl. But, witness what Trent Reznor did with his
"ultra-deluxe limited edition package" of Ghosts I-IV. This even though
you could have gotten the same music for five bucks!

http://ghosts.nin.com/main/order_options
Janice
2008-07-01 18:14:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eiron
Post by Janice
It pleases me no end to learn that vinyl is making a substantial
comeback, and while everyone is talking about the quality of analog
over digital (and it's true)
That quality includes distortion, hum, hiss, rumble, pops and crackles.
So what are the good points of vinyl?
Here is a good analogy: When Walt Disney had his artists prepare the
individual animation cells for whatever animated movie he was
producing at the time, they were expected to include the movement of
"breath" in each of the cells. The golden era of Disney animation
looked so alive (as opposed to today's animation sequences, which look
flat and drawn) because Walt knew that it was the constant "breathing"
of objects that gave them their movement and life (which, of course,
as every mystic, monk, and guru will tell you, is the source of life
and spirit). So, the cells were painted with not only whatever gross
or obvious movement was indicated, but with a constant expansion and
contraction of subtle "breathing" movements... thus the incredible
lifelike dimension of those classic great cartoon movies like Peter
Pan and Cinderella.

The same sort of thing holds true for analog versus digital
recording. In analog recording, the human element of breath, of
slight imperfections of movement, are captured. The music is richer
because of it, because the human intervention of aliveness vitalizes
it.

What excites me is the idea of all the advances in recording
techniques and the growth of knowledge of sound possibilities among
composers and musicians that can be translated to analog rather than
to the flatness of digital perfection. As to the pops and cracks and
hisses you hear, that has much to do with the ambience of a well-worn
and aged vinyl, and the hiss that is present as leakage is undoubtedly
something that can be resolved if and when analog engineers start
developing new and improved stylus's and cartridges as we realign and
refine our musical tastes. I look forward to the next sophistication
of 21st century turntables, which the market will demand as long as
this interest continues to grow.

~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Treadleson
2008-07-02 02:10:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janice
Post by Eiron
Post by Janice
It pleases me no end to learn that vinyl is making a substantial
comeback, and while everyone is talking about the quality of analog
over digital (and it's true)
That quality includes distortion, hum, hiss, rumble, pops and crackles.
So what are the good points of vinyl?
Here is a good analogy: When Walt Disney had his artists prepare the
individual animation cells for whatever animated movie he was
producing at the time, they were expected to include the movement of
"breath" in each of the cells.
Not for nothing did Dali pantingly write to a friend upon reaching
Hollywood that Disney was one of the world's leading surrealists.
(What would he have said about Fleisher?)
Post by Janice
The golden era of Disney animation
looked so alive (as opposed to today's animation sequences, which look
flat and drawn) because Walt knew that it was the constant "breathing"
of objects that gave them their movement and life (which, of course,
as every mystic, monk, and guru will tell you, is the source of life
and spirit). So, the cells were painted with not only whatever gross
or obvious movement was indicated, but with a constant expansion and
contraction of subtle "breathing" movements... thus the incredible
lifelike dimension of those classic great cartoon movies like Peter
Pan and Cinderella.
The same sort of thing holds true for analog versus digital
recording. In analog recording, the human element of breath, of
slight imperfections of movement, are captured. The music is richer
because of it, because the human intervention of aliveness vitalizes
it.
What excites me is the idea of all the advances in recording
techniques and the growth of knowledge of sound possibilities among
composers and musicians that can be translated to analog rather than
to the flatness of digital perfection. As to the pops and cracks and
hisses you hear, that has much to do with the ambience of a well-worn
and aged vinyl, and the hiss that is present as leakage is undoubtedly
something that can be resolved if and when analog engineers start
developing new and improved stylus's and cartridges as we realign and
refine our musical tastes. I look forward to the next sophistication
of 21st century turntables, which the market will demand as long as
this interest continues to grow.
~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Janice
2008-07-03 06:04:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
. . .
Here is a good analogy:  When Walt Disney had his artists prepare the
individual animation cells for whatever animated movie he was
producing at the time, they were expected to include the movement of
"breath" in each of the cells.
Not for nothing did Dali pantingly write to a friend upon reaching
Hollywood that Disney was one of the world's leading surrealists.
(What would he have said about Fleisher?)
I think maybe we're talking about two different (ahem) substances
here... Fleisher was mostly conceptual, while Disney was definitely on
a visual trip. I had forgotten about Dali dallying with Disney -- a
match made in Fantasia. Found the Youtube trailer for Destino (1946),
the Dali short film that was shelved then brought out again just a few
years ago, but I haven't seen the full version yet. It looks
completely modern, so it could have been waaay out of the box for mass
consumption in 1946:



And if that wasn't enough, here's just a day in the life of Dali...
(what a kooky guy):



~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Treadleson
2008-07-04 04:37:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janice
Post by Treadleson
. . .
Here is a good analogy:  When Walt Disney had his artists prepare the
individual animation cells for whatever animated movie he was
producing at the time, they were expected to include the movement of
"breath" in each of the cells.
Not for nothing did Dali pantingly write to a friend upon reaching
Hollywood that Disney was one of the world's leading surrealists.
(What would he have said about Fleisher?)
I think maybe we're talking about two different (ahem) substances
here... Fleisher was mostly conceptual, while Disney was definitely on
a visual trip.  I had forgotten about Dali dallying with Disney -- a
match made in Fantasia.  Found the Youtube trailer for Destino (1946),
the Dali short film that was shelved then brought out again just a few
years ago, but I haven't seen the full version yet.  It looks
completely modern, so it could have been waaay out of the box for mass
http://youtu.be/iO1ghQFSXro
That is absolutely fantastic! Thanks a million. I've never seen
this. Fuckin' wonderful! They MUST, I mean MUST release this in
full.
Post by Janice
And if that wasn't enough, here's just a day in the life of Dali...
http://youtu.be/GfHw4ZU0rYE
         ~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Gemini Jackson
2008-07-04 13:27:06 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Jul 2008 21:37:16 -0700 (PDT), Treadleson
Post by Treadleson
Post by Janice
I think maybe we're talking about two different (ahem) substances
here... Fleisher was mostly conceptual, while Disney was definitely on
a visual trip.  I had forgotten about Dali dallying with Disney -- a
match made in Fantasia.  Found the Youtube trailer for Destino (1946),
the Dali short film that was shelved then brought out again just a few
years ago, but I haven't seen the full version yet.  It looks
completely modern, so it could have been waaay out of the box for mass
http://youtu.be/iO1ghQFSXro
That is absolutely fantastic! Thanks a million. I've never seen
this. Fuckin' wonderful! They MUST, I mean MUST release this in
full.
So did Dali do the frame-by-frame animation or did some of the old men
at Disney imitate his style? Bet Dali would've gotten bored with the
animation process.



~GJ~
Tony Elka
2008-07-04 17:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gemini Jackson
So did Dali do the frame-by-frame animation or did some of the old men
at Disney imitate his style? Bet Dali would've gotten bored with the
animation process.
Animation is a team effort, with very few exceptions.

Tony



"The first man to compare the cheeks of a young woman to a rose was
obviously a poet; the first to repeat it was possibly an idiot. "
-Salvador Dali





http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/spanking

spank·ing      [spang-king] ­adjective
1. moving rapidly and smartly.
2. quick and vigorous: a spanking pace.
3. blowing briskly: a spanking breeze.
4. Informal. unusually fine, great, large, etc.; remarkable;
distinctive: a spanking monogram in gold embroidery.
­adverb
5. Informal. extremely, strikingly, or remarkably; very: three little
girls in spanking new dresses.
6. "Let my enemies devour each other." - Salvador Dali
t***@hotmail.co.uk
2008-07-04 18:01:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Elka
"The first man to compare the cheeks of a young woman to a rose was
obviously a poet; the first to repeat it was possibly an idiot. "
                                                  -Salvador Dali
I love Dali but he's got it the wrong way round.

R. Totale
2008-07-04 13:40:26 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 3 Jul 2008 21:37:16 -0700 (PDT), Treadleson
Post by Treadleson
That is absolutely fantastic! Thanks a million. I've never seen
this. Fuckin' wonderful! They MUST, I mean MUST release this in
full.
There are several "full" versions on YouTube (handhelds at theatre
showings with people coughing and walking around) to watch while
you're waiting.
Just Walkin'
2008-07-04 16:36:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
Post by Janice
Post by Treadleson
. . .
Post by Janice
Here is a good analogy: When Walt Disney had his artists prepare the
individual animation cells for whatever animated movie he was
producing at the time, they were expected to include the movement of
"breath" in each of the cells.
Not for nothing did Dali pantingly write to a friend upon reaching
Hollywood that Disney was one of the world's leading surrealists.
(What would he have said about Fleisher?)
I think maybe we're talking about two different (ahem) substances
here... Fleisher was mostly conceptual, while Disney was definitely on
a visual trip. I had forgotten about Dali dallying with Disney -- a
match made in Fantasia. Found the Youtube trailer for Destino (1946),
the Dali short film that was shelved then brought out again just a few
years ago, but I haven't seen the full version yet. It looks
completely modern, so it could have been waaay out of the box for mass
http://youtu.be/iO1ghQFSXro
That is absolutely fantastic! Thanks a million. I've never seen
this. Fuckin' wonderful! They MUST, I mean MUST release this in
full.
Post by Janice
And if that wasn't enough, here's just a day in the life of Dali...
http://youtu.be/GfHw4ZU0rYE
~`~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Reading the posts related to it on youtube, it appears that it will be
released later this year.
Eric Ramon
2008-06-30 23:55:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Grateful Dead, VU, Pink Floyd, Tim Buckley all got lots of play as FM
went nuts. But I never heard of Serpent Power. That has to be some
Rolling Stone staffer's quirky pick.
The World Wide Wade
2008-07-01 03:04:41 UTC
Permalink
In article
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Grateful Dead, VU, Pink Floyd, Tim Buckley all got lots of play as FM
went nuts. But I never heard of Serpent Power. That has to be some
Rolling Stone staffer's quirky pick.
FM went nuts in 67?
Eric Ramon
2008-07-01 03:49:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by The World Wide Wade
In article
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Grateful Dead, VU, Pink Floyd, Tim Buckley all got lots of play as FM
went nuts. But I never heard of Serpent Power. That has to be some
Rolling Stone staffer's quirky pick.
FM went nuts in 67?
yeh, don't you remember? As an alternative to what was on AM.
"Attitude music", Murray the K called it, after he left WINS-AM and
went to the FM world.

Here...clipped from Wikipedia:

A year later, in 1966, the FCC ruled that AM and FM radio stations
could no longer simply simultaneously broadcast the same content,
opening the door for Murray to lead the FM rock radio revolution as
program director and primetime dj on WOR-FM — one of the first FM rock
stations, soon airing such legendary djs as Rosko and Scott Muni in
the new FM format. Murray played long cutting-edge album cuts rather
than singles, often playing groups of songs by one artist, or
thematically linked songs, uninterrupted by commercials. He created
the ground-breaking FM radio format that would transform music radio,
combining live in-studio interviews with folk-rock — he called it
"attitude music" — and all forms of popular music in a free-form
format.
Babs
2008-07-01 10:39:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by The World Wide Wade
In article
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by poisoned rose
A single year and that much great original music.  It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Grateful Dead, VU, Pink Floyd, Tim Buckley all got lots of play as FM
went nuts. But I never heard of Serpent Power. That has to be some
Rolling Stone staffer's quirky pick.
FM went nuts in 67?
yeh, don't you remember? As an alternative to what was on AM.
"Attitude music", Murray the K called it, after he left WINS-AM and
went to the FM world.
A year later, in 1966, the FCC ruled that AM and FM radio stations
could no longer simply simultaneously broadcast the same content,
opening the door for Murray to lead the FM rock radio revolution as
program director and primetime dj on WOR-FM — one of the first FM rock
stations, soon airing such legendary djs as Rosko and Scott Muni in
the new FM format. Murray played long cutting-edge album cuts rather
than singles, often playing groups of songs by one artist, or
thematically linked songs, uninterrupted by commercials. He created
the ground-breaking FM radio format that would transform music radio,
combining live in-studio interviews with folk-rock — he called it
"attitude music" — and all forms of popular music in a free-form
format.
And don't forget WNEW-FM and Alison.
Also clipped form Wikipedia:
"Born in Brooklyn, Alison Steele achieved her greatest notoriety as a
DJ on WNEW-FM, where she spun records on the night shift, after a
major change in station programming from an all-female MOR music
format to progressive rock. Alison didn't know much about progressive
rock when she started at this, and neither, apparently did the
management of WNEW-FM. She was basically left to her own devices and
in this process, developed her persona, The Nightbird.
She would start her show reciting poetry over Andean flute music, then
introduce her show in her well-known sultry, smoky voice:
“The flutter of wings, the shadow across the moon, the sounds of the
night, as the Nightbird spreads her wings and soars, above the earth,
into another level of comprehension, where we exist only to feel.
Come, fly with me, Alison Steele, the Nightbird, at WNEW-FM, until
dawn.”
and then transition to recordings of some of the more exceptional and
experimental music acts of the time. Some of the groups she would
feature at that time would be Yes, King Crimson, Genesis, Hawkwind,
Lothar and the Hand People, Tangerine Dream, Edgar Froese, Moody
Blues, Ramases, Renaissance, Curved Air, and many other groups of that
genre. If it was raining on a Monday night, she would always play The
Doors' classic "Riders on the Storm" as her first song setting the
mood for that night's show. She would always end her shows with The
Beatles song Flying over which she would say a goodbye message."
Treadleson
2008-07-01 16:30:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Babs
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by The World Wide Wade
In article
Post by Eric Ramon
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Grateful Dead, VU, Pink Floyd, Tim Buckley all got lots of play as FM
went nuts. But I never heard of Serpent Power. That has to be some
Rolling Stone staffer's quirky pick.
FM went nuts in 67?
yeh, don't you remember? As an alternative to what was on AM.
"Attitude music", Murray the K called it, after he left WINS-AM and
went to the FM world.
A year later, in 1966, the FCC ruled that AM and FM radio stations
could no longer simply simultaneously broadcast the same content,
opening the door for Murray to lead the FM rock radio revolution as
program director and primetime dj on WOR-FM — one of the first FM rock
stations, soon airing such legendary djs as Rosko and Scott Muni in
the new FM format. Murray played long cutting-edge album cuts rather
than singles, often playing groups of songs by one artist, or
thematically linked songs, uninterrupted by commercials. He created
the ground-breaking FM radio format that would transform music radio,
combining live in-studio interviews with folk-rock — he called it
"attitude music" — and all forms of popular music in a free-form
format.
And don't forget WNEW-FM and Alison.
"Born in Brooklyn, Alison Steele achieved her greatest notoriety as a
DJ on WNEW-FM, where she spun records on the night shift, after a
major change in station programming from an all-female MOR music
format to progressive rock. Alison didn't know much about progressive
rock when she started at this, and neither, apparently did the
management of WNEW-FM. She was basically left to her own devices and
in this process, developed her persona, The Nightbird.
She would start her show reciting poetry over Andean flute music, then
“The flutter of wings, the shadow across the moon, the sounds of the
night, as the Nightbird spreads her wings and soars, above the earth,
into another level of comprehension, where we exist only to feel.
Come, fly with me, Alison Steele, the Nightbird, at WNEW-FM, until
dawn.”
and then transition to recordings of some of the more exceptional and
experimental music acts of the time. Some of the groups she would
feature at that time would be Yes, King Crimson, Genesis, Hawkwind,
Lothar and the Hand People, Tangerine Dream, Edgar Froese, Moody
Blues, Ramases, Renaissance, Curved Air, and many other groups of that
genre. If it was raining on a Monday night, she would always play The
Doors' classic "Riders on the Storm" as her first song setting the
mood for that night's show. She would always end her shows with The
Beatles song Flying over which she would say a goodbye message."
I used to work at this place where there was a phone hanging on the
wall (to call whom I don't know) and it was labeled "Ramone Phone."
RichL
2008-07-01 01:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
A lot of that stuff got airplay on the budding FM stations at the time.
I distinctly remember cuts from the Grateful Dead album, CJ & Fish's
"Electric Music For The Mind And Body", Big Brother, "Are You
Experienced", "Disraeli Gears", and "Days Of Future Passed" on Boston's
"underground" FM station, WBCN. If I hadn't, I wouldn't have been
exposed to this stuff and consequently wouldn't have bought these
albums.
Lizz Holmans
2008-07-01 02:02:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
A lot of that stuff got airplay on the budding FM stations at the time.
I distinctly remember cuts from the Grateful Dead album, CJ & Fish's
"Electric Music For The Mind And Body", Big Brother, "Are You
Experienced", "Disraeli Gears", and "Days Of Future Passed" on Boston's
"underground" FM station, WBCN. If I hadn't, I wouldn't have been
exposed to this stuff and consequently wouldn't have bought these
albums.
We had the FM radio station at University of Tulsa when I was that
age; being programmed solely by students, they made sure we heard a
*lot* of stuff. It was amazing.

Lizz 'and so was I...then' Holmans

--

Well, it certainly may be necessary that a woman should shoot a man-- especially in Oregon. Anthony Trollope, _The Way We Live Now
RichL
2008-07-01 04:02:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lizz Holmans
Lizz 'and so was I...then' Holmans
You still are!
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 03:50:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
A lot of that stuff got airplay on the budding FM stations at the time.
I distinctly remember cuts from the Grateful Dead album, CJ & Fish's
"Electric Music For The Mind And Body", Big Brother, "Are You
Experienced", "Disraeli Gears", and "Days Of Future Passed" on Boston's
"underground" FM station, WBCN. If I hadn't, I wouldn't have been
exposed to this stuff and consequently wouldn't have bought these
albums.
Well, but the Grateful Dead debut was the only record you named which I
had questioned.
Dale Houstman
2008-07-01 01:19:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
You're right, but although the poster's choice of only Clear Channel as
a culprit is a bit reductive - there is a cultural point here. Although
radio in the 60s probably didn't specifically help those particular acts
and records along very much, the radio "culture" then was less
compartmentalized, open to experimental formats and personalities, and
less controlling as to playlists. All that would tend to encourage - in
a listener - a wider perspective on musical taste, and a tendency
towards personal experimentation. Thus I think Clear Channel (as a
representative model of modern radio) can be seen as damaging to musical
tastes in general. MTV certainly helped, amongt other media.

dmh
Robert
2008-07-01 02:19:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
A single year and that much great original music.  It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Well, I was being a little flippant. Clear Channel is just one of the
many corporate villains that have contributed to the demise of popular
music in this country.
Gemini Jackson
2008-07-01 16:27:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Robert
A single year and that much great original music. It's a truly
astonishing list, regardless of its omissions. What have you done to
us, Clear Channel?
Well, I'm just guessing, but I doubt the Grateful Dead's debut, VU &
Nico, Howard Tate, the Serpent Power, Piper at the Gates of Dawn,
Goodbye & Hello, Easter Everywhere and Mississippi John Hurt got an
awful lot of help from radio back then.
1967 was a fantastic year of music, sure, but consider the cultural
explosion happening at the time. Blaming the then/now contrast all on
Clear Channel is too easy.
Now, go buy the amazing new Portishead album. Or Stephen Malkmus's
latest. Or.... :)
Warpaint!
~GJ~
The Arranger
2008-07-01 01:36:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Nothing too controversial about this list (especially since it's unranked), but I do gotta wonder
about including the Serpent Power (who??) at the expense of other pop/rock staples including three
Monkees records, Their Satanic Majesties Request, the Mothers' Absolutely Free and Captain
Beefheart's Safe as Milk. And if blues albums are fair game (see Mississippi John Hurt), where is
Magic Sam's legendary West Side Soul?
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
My nominations for the "couple of jazz albums":

1. Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs
2. McCoy Tyner: The Real McCoy

Most, I would guess, would nominate one Miles Davis (he had two that
year: Nefertiti and Sorcerer) and Coltrane's Interstellar Space.

The Arranger

The Arranger
Mackenzie
2008-07-01 02:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Arranger
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Nothing too controversial about this list (especially since it's unranked), but I do gotta wonder
about including the Serpent Power (who??) at the expense of other pop/rock staples including three
Monkees records, Their Satanic Majesties Request, the Mothers' Absolutely Free and Captain
Beefheart's Safe as Milk. And if blues albums are fair game (see Mississippi John Hurt), where is
Magic Sam's legendary West Side Soul?
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
1. Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs
2. McCoy Tyner: The Real McCoy
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
RichL
2008-07-01 04:08:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out. I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of Chris
Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the last
studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band. Later Byrds
albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the band no longer
held that special place in my heart.
Mackenzie
2008-07-01 22:39:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out.  I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of Chris
Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the last
studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band.  Later Byrds
albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the band no longer
held that special place in my heart.
Yes, that album was one of my favorites. My favorite songs were "So
You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star' and 'Mind Gardens', with possibly
'Thoughts and Words' behind the two I just mentioned.

I believe 'Between the Buttons' shows the Rolling Stones moving into
new musical territory, which is quite a contrast to the album previous
to it- 'Aftermath'. Most of the songs on "Between the Buttons" are
rarely played on classical rock stations anymore.
RichL
2008-07-02 00:15:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mackenzie
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti',
also 'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?)
is quite good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger
than Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling
Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out. I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of
Chris Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the
last studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band.
Later Byrds albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the
band no longer held that special place in my heart.
Yes, that album was one of my favorites. My favorite songs were "So
You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star' and 'Mind Gardens', with possibly
'Thoughts and Words' behind the two I just mentioned.
Thoughts and Words was the one that really got me. A true hidden gem!
I think our band learned that one in record time - I just *had* to play
it!
Treadleson
2008-07-02 02:15:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mackenzie
Post by RichL
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out. I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of Chris
Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the last
studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band. Later Byrds
albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the band no longer
held that special place in my heart.
Yes, that album was one of my favorites. My favorite songs were "So
You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star' and 'Mind Gardens', with possibly
'Thoughts and Words' behind the two I just mentioned.
I believe 'Between the Buttons' shows the Rolling Stones moving into
new musical territory, which is quite a contrast to the album previous
to it- 'Aftermath'. Most of the songs on "Between the Buttons" are
rarely played on classical rock stations anymore.
On their little blurb about FLOWERS they say they don't know what Lady
Jane is about. I'm sure they're joking. They ARE joking....right?
Babs
2008-07-02 03:02:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
Post by Mackenzie
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out.  I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of Chris
Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the last
studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band.  Later Byrds
albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the band no longer
held that special place in my heart.
Yes, that album was one of my favorites. My favorite songs were "So
You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star' and 'Mind Gardens', with possibly
'Thoughts and Words' behind the two I just mentioned.
I believe 'Between the Buttons' shows the Rolling Stones moving into
new musical territory, which is quite a contrast to the album previous
to it- 'Aftermath'. Most of the songs on "Between the Buttons" are
rarely played on classical rock stations anymore.
On their little blurb about FLOWERS they say they don't know what Lady
Jane is about.  I'm sure they're joking.  They ARE joking....right?
Tonight I watched the movie "The Other Boleyn Girl", with Natalie
Portman and Scarlett Johansson. It was pretty good for a film that
went to dvd so quickly.
O'Leary III
2008-07-02 03:05:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Babs
Post by Treadleson
On their little blurb about FLOWERS they say they don't know what Lady
Jane is about. I'm sure they're joking. They ARE joking....right?
Tonight I watched the movie "The Other Boleyn Girl", with Natalie
Portman and Scarlett Johansson. It was pretty good for a film that
went to dvd so quickly.
Funny you should say that. Yesterday I had no traffic on 95. None.
RichL
2008-07-02 04:03:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by O'Leary III
Post by Babs
Tonight I watched the movie "The Other Boleyn Girl", with Natalie
Portman and Scarlett Johansson. It was pretty good for a film that
went to dvd so quickly.
Funny you should say that. Yesterday I had no traffic on 95. None.
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
bigaudio
2008-07-02 14:11:14 UTC
Permalink
I am a bit surprised nobody said anything about one of my favorites on
there, The Who Sell Out. The days of the week, and you're wondering
what is this? Then when the music starts, the first sounds of the
band on Armenia City In The Sky, the incredible power of those first
few seconds and you realize you are in for a powerful ride. The Who
made a wonderful record that is always a fun listen even now. That
record meant more to me than almost every other one on there. The
guitar, bass, combined to form an energy few bands could on their best
day, and Keith Moon was simply amazing. Fantastic album in my
opinion, definitely underrated.

bigaudio
Must Be The Music, That's Turning Me On ....... Mick Jones
Bernie Woodham
2008-07-02 15:35:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigaudio
I am a bit surprised nobody said anything about one of my favorites on
there, The Who Sell Out. The days of the week, and you're wondering
what is this? Then when the music starts, the first sounds of the
band on Armenia City In The Sky, the incredible power of those first
few seconds and you realize you are in for a powerful ride. The Who
made a wonderful record that is always a fun listen even now. That
record meant more to me than almost every other one on there. The
guitar, bass, combined to form an energy few bands could on their best
day, and Keith Moon was simply amazing. Fantastic album in my
opinion, definitely underrated.
bigaudio
Must Be The Music, That's Turning Me On ....... Mick Jones

poisoned rose
2008-07-02 19:32:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by bigaudio
I am a bit surprised nobody said anything about one of my favorites on
there, The Who Sell Out.
Well...lots of RMBers like the album, and it is on the list. There's
just not much reason to talk about it, in this particular context.

I'm sure there are also lots of people here who like Surrealistic
Pillow, Are You Experienced?, Buffalo Springfield Again, The Doors,
Strange Days, Disraeli Gears, Days of Future Passed, Between the
Buttons, Something Else, etc.
O'Leary III
2008-07-02 18:04:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
Yet, it's so good for your bones!
RichL
2008-07-02 19:02:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by O'Leary III
Post by RichL
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
Yet, it's so good for your bones!
Now you've given me an excuse to treat myself this evening!
O'Leary III
2008-07-02 20:03:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by O'Leary III
Post by RichL
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
Yet, it's so good for your bones!
Now you've given me an excuse to treat myself this evening!
Enjoy!
O'Leary III
2008-07-03 03:33:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by O'Leary III
Post by RichL
Post by O'Leary III
Post by RichL
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
Yet, it's so good for your bones!
Now you've given me an excuse to treat myself this evening!
Enjoy!
I did the same. Phish Food!
RichL
2008-07-03 03:42:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by O'Leary III
I did the same. Phish Food!
Which reminds me... (Dublin mudslide!)
Jeff
2008-07-03 13:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by O'Leary III
Post by RichL
Post by O'Leary III
Ice cream has no bones!  NONE!
Yet, it's so good for your bones!
Now you've given me an excuse to treat myself this evening!
Enjoy!
I ate some Octopus (sp?) the other night. Rubbery stuff. I almost spit
it out.
O'Leary III
2008-07-03 15:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jeff
I ate some Octopus (sp?) the other night. Rubbery stuff. I almost spit
it out.
No, thank you.
Lookingglass
2008-07-02 19:04:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Ice cream has no bones! NONE!
I actually prefer the boneless Rocky Road with a bit of *road-kill* gristle
in it.

www.Shemakhan.com
Mackenzie
2008-07-02 20:50:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
Post by Mackenzie
Post by Mackenzie
I would also add MIles Davis' albums 'Sorcerer' and 'Nefertiti', also
'Ludo' by Ivor Cutler (remember him on Magical Mystery Tour?) is quite
good. But my favorite album of that year would be 'Younger than
Yesterday' by The Byrds or 'Between the Buttons' by Rolling Stones.
"Younger Than Yesterday" had a huge impact on me when it came out.  I
was a big Byrds fan already, but that album saw the emergence of Chris
Hillman as a serious songwriter...and would turn out to be the last
studio album in which David Crosby was a part of the band.  Later Byrds
albums were good and I bought a couple of them, but the band no longer
held that special place in my heart.
Yes, that album was one of my favorites. My favorite songs were "So
You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star' and 'Mind Gardens', with possibly
'Thoughts and Words' behind the two I just mentioned.
I believe 'Between the Buttons' shows the Rolling Stones moving into
new musical territory, which is quite a contrast to the album previous
to it- 'Aftermath'. Most of the songs on "Between the Buttons" are
rarely played on classical rock stations anymore.
On their little blurb about FLOWERS they say they don't know what Lady
Jane is about.  I'm sure they're joking.  They ARE joking....right?- Hide quoted text -
No, they weren't joking. Mick Jagger still doesn't know what the song
is about either it was just that the names fit together,
unconsciously, from the same time period.

There is some speculation that the song was written about Jane
Seymour, wife of King Henry.
Lizz Holmans
2008-07-02 21:22:55 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 2 Jul 2008 13:50:37 -0700 (PDT), Mackenzie
Post by Mackenzie
No, they weren't joking. Mick Jagger still doesn't know what the song
is about either it was just that the names fit together,
unconsciously, from the same time period.
There is some speculation that the song was written about Jane
Seymour, wife of King Henry.
So you think it's just coincidence that _Lady Chatterley's Lover_by
D.H. Lawrence being published legally in the U.K. in 1963 (which was a
little too early for me)?

Lizz 'the Larkin the morning' Holmans
--

Well, it certainly may be necessary that a woman should shoot a man-- especially in Oregon. Anthony Trollope, _The Way We Live Now
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 03:55:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Arranger
Post by poisoned rose
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such
as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of
the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and
a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
1. Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs
2. McCoy Tyner: The Real McCoy
Most, I would guess, would nominate one Miles Davis (he had two that
year: Nefertiti and Sorcerer) and Coltrane's Interstellar Space.
Yes, Nefertiti was my prime thought for that "couple of jazz" category.
The Arranger
2008-07-01 16:00:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by The Arranger
Post by poisoned rose
(My own personal bent would dictate substituting some quirkier items such
as Nico/Chelsea Girl,
Love/Da Capo, the Merry-Go-Round's debut, Morton Subotnick/Silver Apples of
the Moon, the Lovin'
Spoonful/Everything Playing, the Incredible String Band's second album and
a couple of jazz records.
But that's just me.)
1. Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs
2. McCoy Tyner: The Real McCoy
Most, I would guess, would nominate one Miles Davis (he had two that
year: Nefertiti and Sorcerer) and Coltrane's Interstellar Space.
Yes, Nefertiti was my prime thought for that "couple of jazz" category.
Check out "Now He Sings" if you haven't. A definite surprise or those
who know Corea only through his "Return To Forever" work.

The Arranger
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 20:14:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by The Arranger
Post by poisoned rose
Post by The Arranger
1. Chick Corea: Now He Sings, Now He Sobs
2. McCoy Tyner: The Real McCoy
Most, I would guess, would nominate one Miles Davis (he had two that
year: Nefertiti and Sorcerer) and Coltrane's Interstellar Space.
Yes, Nefertiti was my prime thought for that "couple of jazz" category.
Check out "Now He Sings" if you haven't.
Okey dokey.
Mackenzie
2008-07-01 02:07:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Anyone heard the Serpent Power? The AllMusic soundclips sound dated, but not too bad. Kinda like
Jefferson Airplane in their early folk-rock phase, plus tinny Ray Manzarek organ? Though I bet the
13-minute track is a chore to sit through.
http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hjfuxqugldfe
The name doesn't sound too familiar. I might have listened to a song
or two on my radio, but never knowing that the music came from this
band.
Post by poisoned rose
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
Interesting addition, yes. I think Serpent Power's addition on the
list was to point out that music or reflect the point that music was
moving more towards the folk-rock, psychedelic scene in that year.
During that time period, other more noteworthy bands were trying to
move towards this music genre since the young minds of America seemed
to demand it. This compiled list was meant to be a sort of listing of
the quintessential '67 albums that highlighted this particular era of
music. Nothing more, certainly nothing less.
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 03:56:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mackenzie
Post by poisoned rose
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed
back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying
blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
Interesting addition, yes. I think Serpent Power's addition on the
list was to point out that music or reflect the point that music was
moving more towards the folk-rock, psychedelic scene in that year.
During that time period, other more noteworthy bands were trying to
move towards this music genre since the young minds of America seemed
to demand it. This compiled list was meant to be a sort of listing of
the quintessential '67 albums that highlighted this particular era of
music. Nothing more, certainly nothing less.
When was this 1967 list published? The site doesn't seem to say.
Mackenzie
2008-07-01 23:05:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by Mackenzie
Post by poisoned rose
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed
back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying
blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
Interesting addition, yes. I think Serpent Power's addition on the
list was to point out that music or reflect the point that music was
moving more towards the folk-rock, psychedelic scene in that year.
During that time period, other more noteworthy bands were trying to
move towards this music genre since the young minds of America seemed
to demand it. This compiled list was meant to be a sort of listing of
the quintessential '67 albums  that highlighted this particular era of
music. Nothing more, certainly nothing less.
When was this 1967 list published? The site doesn't seem to say.
You could try this page, it says the article was published on the
internet July 3, 2007

http://www.rollingstone.com/rockdaily/index.php/2007/07/03/the-forty-essential-albums-of-1967-reviews-clips/
khematite
2008-07-01 02:41:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
Stumbled upon this yesterday, while looking for something else.
Anyone heard the Serpent Power? The AllMusic soundclips sound dated, but not too bad. Kinda like
Jefferson Airplane in their early folk-rock phase, plus tinny Ray Manzarek organ? Though I bet the
13-minute track is a chore to sit through.
http://allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=10:hjfuxqugldfe
The peculiar Serpent Power pick makes me wonder if this list was composed back in the '60s, rather
than assembled with hindsight in recent times. (Though the accompanying blurbs are obviously more
contemporary.)
I have clear memories of regularly hearing "Endless Tunnel" played on
WNEW-FM back in 1967--and for several years thereafter.

http://www.bigbridge.org/issue11/dmmemorylewis.htm

"FM radio opened up a world of terrific music, most of which was
revelatory. The hip station of the NYC area was WNEW-FM (102.7) which
featured radio hosts such as "The Night Bird" Allison Steele, who
would recite poetry between records and Rosko, a black DJ who would
stop his show to denounce the still-raging Vietnam War.

It was the era of free-form, "underground" radio with DJs playing what
they wanted with no playlists to guide them. Many of the DJs, to
demonstrate that they had unshackled themselves from accursed Top 40
radio, tended to play the longest songs they could find.

Scott Muni, a gravel-voiced refugee from the Top 40 world, used to
love to play something called "The Endless Tunnel." Classic
psychedelia (with an electric banjo yet!), it was about a guy on a
train, the train was going someplace, but the singer didn't seem to
know where he was going. Heavy! After about twelve minutes of this T-
shirt existentialism, the song started slowing down for the big pay-
off:

Well I was led into the engineer's cabin
His broad back before me quilted with muscles
I said, "Where are you taking us, where are we going?
Where are you taking us, where are we going?"
He turned around slowly, smiling, and said,
"I don't know. I'm just following ...
Just following the tracks ..."

"That was Serpent Power, "The Endless Tunnel," intoned Muni. And just
to let us, the listeners, know how privileged we were, he gravely
intoned: "And don't go looking for it in the record stores, its long
out of print!"
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 03:55:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by khematite
It was the era of free-form, "underground" radio with DJs playing what
they wanted with no playlists to guide them.
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards, when
getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.

Incidentally, there's an excellent commercial radio station in my area,
which is essentially unformatted and plays all kinds of righteous,
uncompromised music. http://www.indie1031.fm And it's even operated by
Clear Channel.
RichL
2008-07-01 04:11:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by khematite
It was the era of free-form, "underground" radio with DJs playing
what they wanted with no playlists to guide them.
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards, when
getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.
One difference I think is that the typical college radio stations
transmit on fairly weak transmitters, so they don't have the coverage
areas that a lot of the old underground stations did. There are a few
good college stations in my area, but they don't come in well at all
where I live.
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 04:14:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichL
Post by poisoned rose
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards, when
getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.
One difference I think is that the typical college radio stations
transmit on fairly weak transmitters, so they don't have the coverage
areas that a lot of the old underground stations did. There are a few
good college stations in my area, but they don't come in well at all
where I live.
I considered this, but...those stations weren't called "underground"
PURELY because of the music they played, were they? I mean, to me, the
adjective "underground" certainly connotes a station which requires a
bit of effort to hear.
RichL
2008-07-01 04:37:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by RichL
Post by poisoned rose
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards,
when getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.
One difference I think is that the typical college radio stations
transmit on fairly weak transmitters, so they don't have the coverage
areas that a lot of the old underground stations did. There are a
few good college stations in my area, but they don't come in well at
all where I live.
I considered this, but...those stations weren't called "underground"
PURELY because of the music they played, were they? I mean, to me, the
adjective "underground" certainly connotes a station which requires a
bit of effort to hear.
I always understood that the term came about because they were
considered part of the counterculture. My direct experience is limited;
Boston's WBCN had existed previously as a classical music station, and
the new "underground" format probably inherited a powerful transmitter.
I'd be interested in hearing the experiences of others, though.
Treadleson
2008-07-01 06:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
Post by khematite
It was the era of free-form, "underground" radio with DJs playing what
they wanted with no playlists to guide them.
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards, when
getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.
Incidentally, there's an excellent commercial radio station in my area,
which is essentially unformatted and plays all kinds of righteous,
uncompromised music.http://www.indie1031.fm And it's even operated by
Clear Channel.
I sometimes listen to WFMU, which used to be a college station, and
was where I got most of my radio listening done. But that was over 12
years ago. At the time that station struck me as unusually good for
college radio. The Columbia and Fordham stations weren't nearly at
FMU's level of originality and creativity. I also believe that at one
time KROQ out of Pasadena was like the sixties FM stations in that the
DJ's were musically knowledgeable and had no problem mixing songs that
were charting with obscure imports, movie soundtracks, interviews,
underground artists and so forth. I thought that satellite radio was
going to be a return to free form and that DJ's were going to be freed
from the non-stop promotion game. Instead it appears to be either
niche or celebrity driven by way of a celebrity dj. Or else I'm just
missing the good stuff.
Dan the Man
2008-07-01 17:07:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
Post by poisoned rose
Post by khematite
It was the era of free-form, "underground" radio with DJs playing what
they wanted with no playlists to guide them.
But when you talk about "underground radio," there is college radio
today. Seems like people sometimes apply two different standards, when
getting all sentimental for those old days of radio.
Incidentally, there's an excellent commercial radio station in my area,
which is essentially unformatted and plays all kinds of righteous,
uncompromised music.http://www.indie1031.fmAnd it's even operated by
Clear Channel.
I sometimes listen to WFMU, which used to be a college station, and
was where I got most of my radio listening done.  But that was over 12
years ago.  At the time that station struck me as unusually good for
college radio.  The Columbia and Fordham stations weren't nearly at
FMU's level of originality and creativity.  I also believe that at one
time KROQ out of Pasadena was like the sixties FM stations in that the
DJ's were musically knowledgeable and had no problem mixing songs that
were charting with obscure imports, movie soundtracks, interviews,
underground artists and so forth.  I thought that satellite radio was
going to be a return to free form and that DJ's were going to be freed
from the non-stop promotion game.  Instead it appears to be either
niche or celebrity driven by way of a celebrity dj.  Or else I'm just
missing the good stuff.
Here's a "Welcome to Fantasy Island" thought - I wonder if it ever
occurred to any prog-rock veterans to buy their own network of
stations? They could then use those stations to play both new and old
prog. Just my tuppence from dreamland - I'll wake up now!
poisoned rose
2008-07-01 20:04:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
I sometimes listen to WFMU, which used to be a college station, and
was where I got most of my radio listening done. But that was over 12
years ago. At the time that station struck me as unusually good for
college radio.
Well, sure. That station is legendary.
Jon
2008-07-03 04:19:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Treadleson
Columbia and Fordham stations weren't nearly at
FMU's level of originality and creativity.
WKCR did play a lot of really good outside material after midnight. In
recent times it's not been anywhere near as good.

Thing about WFMU is that if you don't like what you hear, tune it in
fifteen minutes later and it's likely to be radically different.

Except of course for the "this is so bad it's hip" material they seem
prone to at times (and I say this as a loyal listener and supporter, who
also appeared as a guest on the air a number of times back in the late
70s and 80s).
--
"Coloured and animated, the concerts and spectacles are as
many invitations to discover the universes of musicians and
artists who tint with happiness our reality."
Eiron
2008-07-01 10:09:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by poisoned rose
http://www.rollingstone.com/photos/gallery/15327933
11. By general standards, I'd say Band of Gypsies easily tops Axis: Bold as Love as Hendrix's "most
overlooked album." Didn't know Hendrix lost the original side-one mixes in a taxi, though. Nice one!
It's in the sleeve notes on my copy so it's not exactly a secret.
I wonder if some retired taxi driver still has the tape in his loft.
--
Eiron.
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